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“Intellectual Property Rights as a smarter way to reform education sector”


Intelligent structures are the product of a unique, new and innovative personal understanding, with a certain market value, and the construction of an individual or group. Intellectual property can be intellectual, invention, copyrighted work, quote or creative writing, copyrighted work, trademark, industrial process, story structure, medical composition, computer program, presentation, or digital magnetic origin data. While it may seem that almost anything can be taken for granted and fall into one of the aforementioned categories, it is not. Considering a recent Supreme Court decision regarding genetic predisposition and genetic sequence, their modification could significantly increase the risk of breast and cervical cancer.


Intellectual property is generally considered to be the invention of a patent or a patent, a trademark, or a copyrighted material. These patents can be considered as the crown of the university, as it provides a university vehicle for develop their different market practices and objectives and, at the same time, reap financial benefits. Although new information may be considered intellectual property and may be copyrighted, not all materials may be of university value. For example, copyright for basic biomedical tools may hinder basic research; therefore, universities may consciously choose not to disclose certain findings - such as DNA sequences that serve only as a signal - which may be basic research tools, and in doing so ensure widespread discovery in the public domain. royalty in educational research, they allow the use of this technology to be obtained at a much lower cost than that of commercial applications. In fact, when discovery is used in research compared to a commercial dam, it creates an affordable access to non-commercial research purposes.

Universities and public research institutes are among the most direct providers of innovation and research, especially in the emerging economy. Universities and public research institutes are among the most direct providers of innovation and research, especially in the emerging economy. The wealth of innovation in the economy also comes from educational institutions and research institutes. Too late, the importance of intellectual property rights (IPR) in higher education has been widely recognized. This can be incorporated into the National IPR Policy approved by the Union Cabinet in May 2016, which was the first IPR policy developed by the Government of India.


The main purpose of this Policy is to promote innovation, especially for entrepreneurs and institutions of higher learning. The Policy Policy specifically addresses the integration of all forms of IPR, the principles and organizations involved in influencing India's new arts and energy with special emphasis on initiatives and educational institutions.

The University Grants Commission (UGC), an accredited official in determining and maintaining university education standards in India, has issued an intellectual property application (IPR) letter as a general choice subject under the Choice Based Credit System (CBCS).


In addition, the National Institutional Ranking Framework (NIRF), a standard program approved by the Department of Labor Development (MHRD), places higher education institutions in India. These positions serve as a way for institutions to engage in promoting innovation, research and development while evaluating their performance beyond academics. One of the parameters considered at the time and in our discussion is Research and Professional Practice which includes IPR and patents - both published and granted, by students and faculty members weighing approximately 15 marks. Publishing and patent applications have been found to be very high from engineering and technical institutions. The level of tertiary institutions has been found to be equal to the number of applications lodged with patents. There has been a significant increase in applications for patents and research literature compared to two years ago since the launch of this stand-off program in 2016.


Intellectual Property Rights as “threat” to education sector, academicians

Intellectual property is generally considered to be the invention of a patent or a patent, a trademark, or a copyrighted material. These patents can be regarded as a university gem, as they provide a vehicle for universities to produce its own unique market practices and objectives and, at the same time, reap financial benefits. Although new information may be considered intellectual property and may be copyrighted, not all materials may be of university value. For example, copyright for basic biomedical tools may hinder basic research; therefore, universities may conscientiously refrain from granting patents for certain findings - such as DNA sequences that serve only as a marker - which could be basic research tools, and in doing so ensure widespread public discovery. Another way universities can ensure the widespread distribution and acceptance of patented acquisitions at university expenditures is the use of low-cost licenses in academic research, allowing the use of this technology to be available at a much lower cost than commercial use. In fact, there is a breakdown of findings used in research compared to a commercial dam, which creates an affordable access point for non-commercial research purposes.


Intellectual property is generally considered to be the invention of a patent or a patent, a trademark, or a copyrighted material. These patents can be regarded as a university gem, as they provide a vehicle for universities to produce its own unique market practices and objectives and, at the same time, reap financial benefits. Although new information may be considered intellectual property and may be copyrighted, not all materials may be of university value. For example, copyright for basic biomedical tools may hinder basic research; therefore, universities may conscientiously refrain from granting patents for certain findings - such as DNA sequences that serve only as a marker - which could be basic research tools, and in doing so ensure widespread public discovery. Another way universities can ensure the widespread distribution and acceptance of patented acquisitions at university expenditures is the use of low-cost licenses in academic research, allowing the use of this technology to be available at a much lower cost than commercial use.


In fact, there is a breakdown of findings used in research compared to a commercial dam, which creates an affordable access point for non-commercial research purposes.


In academia, book, journal, article, research papers etc. Written communication methods in which ideas are transmitted from one person to another or from a group to another. These sources are the media for conveying ideas, educational materials, and are a means of disseminating and understanding information across all fields of study and research. They also serve as stories to explain personal situations, social problems, new discoveries, discoveries, art, jokes, tragedies etc. The only person in charge of intellectual property in these sources is known as the real owner. As a creator or landowner, you have the right to enjoy the fruits of your labor.


Therefore, in almost every country laws exist to protect this intellectual content. In India, the Copyright Act gives this right to the creator of the work and usually lasts for a period of time depending on the provisions of the law that guaranteed this right. Copyright is defined as the right of a person to reproduce, publish or sell his or her original intellect, to transmit ideas / work to the public through social media or to make a new translation or to modify his or her own work and reproduce it etc. This activity covers a wide range of fields, such as writing, music, drama, art, or architecture. Copyright protection is only available for original works, whether published or not yet published. The primary purpose of copyright law is to protect the time, effort, and creativity of the creator.


Conversely, fraudulent, production, distribution or illegal use of copyrighted work. That means crime is a 'copyright infringement'. In the field of education, in the industrial sector, in the field of research, kidnapping crime has been around for decades. In the past there was no provision for criminal detection of research papers, articles, journals, thesis etc. However, these days it has happened because of technological advances. At the same time, the number of cases of personal theft is also increasing. Technology has its “positive” and “negative” effects. In this case, robberies and cheating are serious consequences and the good thing is that, strategies are available these days to find this misconduct. Many people are confused between robbery and cheating and think that both words have the same meaning; but in reality, the crime of committing a crime is copying something and then selling it for money and, cheating is copying something but not selling for financial gain. The Indian government is focusing on this sensitive issue and plans to introduce alternative provisions under anti-burglary laws, with penalties such as deregistration, warning, and fines. On the other hand, the UGC has forced all universities to use cheating, anti-crime software to test their Ph.D. thesis or report of research activities etc.


With robberies rampant these days, proper knowledge and understanding can help everyone to avoid these types of misconduct. Therefore, in this article many important points of theft are discussed, especially the focus on education. This will help the scholar to better understand theft in the fields of education and will also help them to avoid the use of counterfeit sources of information.


Definition of Piracy

Definition of piracy is given in various dictionaries in similar way. For example, Oxford dictionary explains piracy as ‘the unauthorized use or reproducing another’s work, Merriam Webster online dictionary defines piracy as ‘the unauthorized use of another’s production, invention, or conception especially in infringement of a copyright’. So, overall we can say that piracy is the act of copying others findings, ideas, work and reselling or redistributing them without permission for the purpose of making money in common. In addition to the dictionaries, regulatory bodies like UNESCO (2007) has defined piracy as ‘the reproduction and distribution of copies of copyright protected material or the communication to the public and making available of such on online communication networks without the authorization of the right owner(s), where such authorization is required by law’. Piracy crimes are related to unauthorized reproduction (such as printing) and the distribution of hard copies or in a digital format for commercially protected activities.


Effect of Piracy in Educational Field

In the field of education to meet the requirements of this degree, students or researchers often use wasted educational resources. In developing countries the trade in booty books often surpasses the official market. Educational institutions are the main markets for pirates. Crime crime exists at all levels, from theology to students and all kinds of public, private, intermediate universities. Infringement activities include both illegal copying or printing.


Indian Scenario on Book Piracy

In India, a study was conducted by the Human Resource Development Ministry (HRD), which reported that there were three types of robberies, the most common in India. The first is the illegal reprint of books followed by the illegal printing of books using the name of famous authors / writers and the last is the illegal production of translated versions of books in foreign languages. The Pirates should not pay the government or the author or publisher, which makes the Pirates more confident in their daily misconduct. According to international book publishers, in Latin America and Asia, crime has become a warning to future generations. According to the Inter-American Publishers Group, worldwide an average of 50 billion pages are printed annually illegally. Technology is becoming a loophole for robbers because, illegally reprinting a book is a criminal who only needs the first copy to be copied, a scanner to scan the contents of the book, a computer with a viewer, and a press (a small rotator is enough to reprint books). With these few resources, the book can be reprinted in a short period of time.


The original literature contains a warning that "reproduction is not allowed!" The robbers surprisingly shocked this part of the first book again. Due to the rapid advancement of technology and its use in bookbinding, it is difficult to reproduce books, such as the original, it is difficult to distinguish between the original and the plundered even though it is difficult for the publisher and author to identify their work. this cover, even the bar code as well, is different from the rest of the original book. There are many different types of robberies but unauthorized reproduction by copying or reprinting is the main threat to publishers. The robbers republished the book and sold it at a lower price than the original, which was the first ploy to attract readers and book buyers. The Pirates offer unfair competition in real books on the market. A few decades ago, the identification of a counterfeit book was very easy due to its poor quality, but nowadays it has become difficult to distinguish between real and fraud due to the development of book publishing technology. The looted books look exactly the same as the original and these looted versions are sold through small book tables, small retailers, who may not be interested in copyright law or have no knowledge of this type of misconduct. Book hijacking is a big business on a large scale in poor and developing countries, where profits from convicted species are greater than from the original book. The process of obtaining copies is known as reprography and this process is very common in almost every institution in our country.


Due to this rewrite the publishers are unable to meet the purpose of the sale. Sometimes this misconduct is done knowingly, and sometimes unknowingly. Selling and buying convicted books is a crime in our country under Section 63 of the Copyright Act, 1957. In developing countries, the rate of crime increases rapidly because a large number of students in developing countries come from poor financial families and are able to buy their education books. In India expensive books such as medical books are especially well-known because such books are usually written by foreign authors and are not usually available in all parts of our country. The main cause of copyright infringement in the case of books is the high prices of books and the poor economic life of our country's readers.


Conclusion

The book industry is affected by the activities of thieves. The implication is that the book industry in the world will be facing a gradual destruction if the activities of pirates are not banned. Failure to pay taxes to the government by the robbers means that the government has lost more money and will continue to lose a lot of money if the activities of these criminals do not end. There will be a shortage of good writers every day if their work does not give them financial benefits. However, eliminating crime in our communities altogether is not an easy task. We cannot rely solely on the law on crime, nor do we need to act on it. We have to say no to unscrupulous forms of information to support the true wisdom of men. On the other hand, publishers should also reduce their prices without damaging their business and the Publisher should provide sample copies to the authors. In this way we can reduce crime at least in the education system.



References

  1. https://www.hindustantimes.com/education/intellectual-property-rights-a-smarter-way-to-reform-education-sector/story-QOM9z2wpl8nhmAVBuZt8bN.html

  2. http://www.wipo.int/edocs/lexdocs/laws/en/in/in107en.pdf

  3. http://www.thehindu.com/news/cities/Tiruchirapalli

  4. https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/piracy

  5. https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/piracy

  6. https://portal.unesco.org/culture/en/ev.phpurl_id=39397&url_do=do_topic&url_section=201.html

  7. Anyaegbu M I, Piracy and its Effect on the Book Industry in Delta State, IOSR Journal of Research & Method in Education, 6 (4) (2016) 90-99.

  8. Parson P, The Nigerian Copyright Law and its relevance to social changes, The Democrat, (9 May 2000) p. 11.

  9. Piracy-Online Etymology Dictionary, link- www.etymonline.com term=piracy

  10. Ojiji C O, Book piracy and intellectual property development,Daily Star, (4 June 2000), p. 8



NAME - Mayur Jain

YEAR – 4th Year (8th Semester)

COLLEGE/UNIVERSITY – Amity Law School, DELHI (Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University)



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